Impulse Control — Wait at the doorway

This installment in my impulse control training series involves teaching the dog to wait at the doorway — the exercise involves a sit and the dog may self-release after a short duration. As mentioned previously, it is often helpful to train an incompatible behavior in order to eliminate/reduce the occurrence of an undesirable behavior. In this instance by training the dog to wait at a doorway the dog is not then able to:

  • escape from the house
  • jump on approaching guests
  • knock over a child or fragile adult

Wait can also be used effectively to ask your dog to hold position while you:

  • walk down a flight of stairs
  • open his crate door (in the house or in the car)
  • anytime his movement could jeopardize his or your safety

Initial training should be conducted at an inside doorway, so there’s no chance of your dog escaping while he learns this new behavior.

Training — wait at the doorway

Unlike stay, wait simply means pause for a moment. Use it mostly at doorways, stairs, gates, in and out of the house and car. It is easy to teach and takes very little practice, but does require consistent application of the behavior when the stimulus (opening the door) is presented. Do your early training at home and gradually progress to other locations.

  • Start by using an inside doorway
  • Do not have any food in your hands
  • Have your dog on leash. (Note: You won’t be using the leash for anything except to make sure your dog doesn’t leave the training area.)
  • Walk up to the doorway with your dog at your side.
  • Get him to sit.
  • Verbally ask him to “wait” and give a hand-signal (I use the same hand-signal as STAY). The hand-signal I use is a flat hand, palm facing the dog, fingers parallel to the ground, presented at the dog’s eye level.
  • Pivot your body in front of the dog so that you are now facing each other.
  • You take one step backward (now your dog should be in one room and you in another, with the doorway between you). If your dog gets up and moves toward you as you move, just lightly walk into him, using your body as a block (do not use your leash to restrain him). Re-cue the “sit” and “wait” and take 1 step backward.
  • Don’t ask him to hold the wait too long — just a second or two at first.
  • Make sure your dog does not anticipate (get up before you release him). If he does you need to re-cue the behavior again.

When you first start out you may only get a 1 or 2 second “wait”. That’s fine. You are developing the building blocks of the behavior. When your dog is holding his sit you will mark the behavior (reference: https://tailsfromthetrainingcenter.wordpress.com/2012/01/06/positive-reinforcement-training-and-using-a-marker/)
release your dog (before he gets up on his own) and give him a treat or a life reward — like getting a chance to go outside.

Gradually you will work to having duration of 20 – 30 seconds on your wait. You want to have enough time to comfortably get out the door in real life.

In the next installment I’ll review how to train “wait” at an outside doorway.

Good luck 🙂

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